Why is conservation biology so important? How can you help?

Well, first of all, let’s start off by asking ourselves what the definition of this is, dictionary.com states that conservation biology is “the scientific study of the conservation of biological diversity and the effects of humans on the environment.” This means that humans are having an effect on the natural world and that conservation biology is our way to try and protect natural wildlife.

But why would we need to protect it?

There are so many reasons why we need to preserve the natural world other than just caring about the animals and also that we need oxygen to survive. For example, medicine, I know you might be thinking what are you on about, but hear me out. If we killed off all the wildlife, there could’ve been a plant out there that could prevent cancer or dementia and we would miss out on the chance to help so many people and their families because we didn’t preserve any sort of biodiversity. If we actually make the effort to stop or slow down the damage we are doing to the environment, we might stand more of a chance of saving so many people from pain and suffering.

Another of the many reasons why it is essential for us to preserve wildlife, is that everything in this world is linked in some way or another, whether it be directly or indirectly, because the earth is one huge ecosystem, an ecosphere. This means if we don’t make efforts to reduce our negative impact, it will affect something else, and in turn, us, and it already is doing so. Let me give you an example, we have been contaminating rivers and streams for years with pesticides that have ran off farmlands, but this contaminated water is causing harm to fish and other sealife. The problem mainly occurs when these chemicals end up getting mixed together. They tend to form hazardous, more toxic chemicals, which have been affecting fish populations such as salmon, and mixtures of pesticide remains can be found in our food, which could potentially lead to death in extreme situations. (To learn more about this research go to www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080216095740.htm ).

I could sit here all day and talk about how important conservation of wildlife actually is, such as how all species have a right to exist and that future generations should be able to enjoy current species so they aren’t looking back on wildlife today as we look at dinosaurs. Also how oxygen levels in the atmosphere all the time, the list goes on forever, however what’s more important is how we can actually help.

There are actually lots of things you can do to help, even though it might seem like it won’t make a difference, it will over time and overall with the amount of people doing it. So here’s a short list of some of the things you can do:

  1. Recycle
  2. Try not to waste water
  3. Eat less meat – Michael Pollan suggested that if America went meatless 1 night a week, it would have the same impact of getting “30 to 40 million cars off the road for a year”
  4. Eat less beef and lamb – studies have shown that a lot of energy is needed for them to grow, which means more pesticides are used for the larger amount of food they need, also animal manure releases ammonia, nitrous oxides and also methane which is extremely bad for our atmosphere.
  5. Don’t buy wild exotic pets, it is much better to buy captive bred ones.
  6. Try and buy sustainably sourced fish, often labelled with the msc logo.
  7. Use cars less, walk, cycle, or use public transport as is using less fuel than if everyone were to drive individually.
  8. Waste less food, serve less or start a compost pile.
  9. Use locally sourced food where possible – this reduces fuel emissions from transport of food.
  10. Reuse plastic bags – already being encouraged by the legal 5p charge of a plastic bag in the uk.

I could talk forever about why it’s important and how you can help, so if I get enough requests I will be writing a part 2 to this, you can contact me over my instagram @mydreamsivebeenliving or using the contact page on this site.

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